cables


The Winter issue of Twist Collective came up today and in it is my Let it snow pattern. It is so nice to finally see it in print! I was also very happy to see that they have used my design for the news letter picture.  The picture below is taken by Mårten Ivert and is from the magazine.

The pattern features a snowflake cable motif together with i-cord edgings to give the hat and mittens a more finished look. I hope that many of you are as happy with this design as I am! A quick look at the Ravelry activity for the few hours it’s been up tells me you are…

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This is the discreet version of my more symbol obvious Pentagram tam. The cap has a cabled pentacle hidden between the ribbings of this classical style men’s hat. With a fold up it becomes a watch man cap and without the fold it will be discreetly cabled men’s hat with a sign for those who knows how to look for it.

Style and sizing
Hat with folded edge: One size.
Hat without folded edge: small 52 cm / 20 ½”, (medium: 55 cm / 21 ¾”, large: 58 cm / 22 ¾”)
The hat with folded edge  ribbing takes just under 2 skeins of Alaska. For a longer rib or if you need to be on the safe side of the amount used get 3 skeins.

About the yarn
The pattern uses Garnstudio’s Alaska. It is a pure wool worsted yarn that is available in many colours. It has a rather smooth texture that shows off the cables in a good way. Any woollen yarn with similar structure and the same tension/gauge should work fine.

Main Yarn:              Garnstudio Alaska, 2 skeins (total: 100 g, ca 150 m)
Needles:                    5 mm/US 8 circular needle 40 cm / 16” and dpns
Other tools:             cable needle, darning needle
Tension/Gauge: 17 st = 10 cm in stockinette stitch.

Technique
Difficulty: Intermediate
Stitches used: knit, purl, increasing, decreasing, purled decreasing, cables

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The most beautiful part of the autumn is here and I have even had the pleasure of seeing some leaves in their new splendid colours. Autumn has always been my knitting season above all others and this year is no exception. I am currently doing the last knitting for my exhibition, that will open October 2, and in two weeks I’m leaving home for a week of building and hanging of all the knitted objects. I will also translate many of my pattern so you Swedish knitters out there can look forward to patterns in your native language. Apart from actually visiting the exhibition, that is.

For the rest of you it is time to accessorize. Today I will publish a pattern for a men’s hat, the Pentacle Cap, which shows a discreetly cabled pentacle on top of a ribbed hat. This might be the one for those of you not brave enough to carry the full pentagram on the top of your head.

Colder days mean colder floors so the feet will have get warm too, and they will through the Little Luxuries pattern, giving three different variations of a mohair and wool blended slipper, including bows and beads. I was taking the pictures this week, together with my excellent photographer Patrik Petroff (who has taken all the pattern pictures with me in them) so it won’t be a long wait for that pattern now. For those of you who aren’t frilly enough for that sort of embellishment the Sneaker Slipper is also coming up with its recognisable three stripes decoration which brings outdoors sport to indoors floors.

A scarf pattern is also coming up, after all what is autumn without scarves? This one will use those pretty art yarns, that you so often bring home without knowing what to do with them. Having done that myself so many times I had to design something for them. I’m using Napoli for my scarf but you could easily use Noro Silk Garden or any other of those beautiful, but expensive, colour variegated yarns. So start going through those bins of left over skeins and I’ll promise you there will be a pattern for them before the end of September.

I must off course design a shawl pattern for autumn, as well, so when a knitting friend of mine recently celebrated her birthday I took the chance of designing something for her as  gift. I had wanted to make a sea shawl for a long time and her love of the sea matched my shawl idea perfectly. It is knitted in domino knitting, or modular knitting, as you might call it, and has a sea shell/waves of the sea motif that uses the colour variations of a blue-grey-white yarn that will bring out thoughts of a stormy sea with foamy waves in various shades of blue and grey. I’m waiting for the sample – I will not knit this one myself – but once that is done it will be published.

As usual I have also taken part in a challenge in Project Yarnway on Ravelry. The theme for August was “back to school” which made me think of hauling around a laptop and that I needed to have a knitted cover for mine. So here is my laptop cover with i-cord edgings; the i-case. It is felted and the pattern will include instructions for both felting and keeping it to the correct size.

There you have seven patterns to look forward too, and above that there will be a pattern of mine in the upcoming Winter issue of Twist Collective Magazine. It was one of those secret submissions I have been working on this summer and I hope you’ll like it once it is published. It is very much in line what I usually design but that is all I can tell you for now. The rest is still a secret…

In case you think I cannot count: the seventh pattern will be a surprise!

Happy accessorizing!

The interweaving of the lines of the Pentacle called out to me to make them into a cabled pattern even though I had to overcome some strange angles before it could be done.

But here it is: a way to show off who you are on the top of your hat.

Style and sizing
Size: Small/52 cm (Medium/55 cm, Large/58 cm)

The Pentagram Tam is available in two different patterns: one with a wider cabled edge and one with a smaller vintage style ribbed edge.

Size large should fit a man’s head and size small and medium most women’s. The tam with the cabled edge can e used in a slightly larger size since the wider edge will help it stay on even if it’s too big. So if you’re unsure, go up in size for the cabled edge and go down in size for the ribbed edge.

About the yarn

The pattern uses Garnstudio’s Alaska. It is a pure wool worsted yarn that is available in many colours. It has a rather smooth texture that shows off the cables in a good way. Any woollen yarn with similar structure and the same tension/gauge should work fine.

Main Yarn:  Garnstudio Alaska, 2 skeins (3 skeins for tam with cabled edge size large)  (total: 100/150 g, ca 150/225 m)
Additional Yarn: Contrast yarn for provisional cast on for tam with cabled edge.
Needles:  5 mm/US 8 circular needle 40-60 cm and dpns 4 mm/US 6 40 cm circular needle or dpns (for tam with ribbed edge)
Other tools:  cable needle
Tension/Gauge: 17 st = 10 cm

Technique

Difficulty: Experienced
Stitches used: knit, purl, increasing, decreasing, purled decreasing, cables, short rows, picking up stitches, grafting, provisional cast-on

Getting it!

The Pentagram Tam is available as a pdf-file for $5 at my Etsyshop or through  Ravelry (available without an account). It has instructions for both cabled and ribbed edge in three sizes. The pattern has written instructions a well as a chart for the cables.

Ravelry – pattern listing with option to buy and download
Etsy – buy trough my store

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Ps. Not a knitter? You can order your knitted Pentagram Tam from my Etsyshop in your size and choice of colour. Ds.

I have a friend who is a harp player and he lives in Scotland. He usually gets cold hands when he is practicing so when his girlfriend asked me to help her knit a pair of wrist warmers for him I came up with this pattern. They fit snuggly around the hand and wrist so that they won’t get caught in the strings but are still flexible enough not to hinder the movement of the fingers. The Celtic braided pattern on the back of the hand suits a Celtic harp player or any one else who can’t get enough of little cables every where.

Size and pattern
Size: Medium wrist sized woman, smaller wrist sized man
Garment size: hand width: 16 cm , wrist width: 14 cm, arm width: 16 cm, length: 22 cm (it will stretch when worn)

This pattern is made in a ca 16 cm wrist circumference size. For a smaller size subtract 4 stitches in all, by taking away 2 st before the thumb and 1 st before and 1 st after the cable pattern. For a larger size add 4 stitches in all, by adding 2 stitches before the thumb and 1 stitch before and 1 stitch after the cable pattern. Make sure that the ribbing will line up with the cable pattern when starting the ribbing.

If you wish to have a pattern with size small, medium and large together with a chart and a full written pattern for the right hand there is a pdf-file that you can download for $2 through Ravelrybuy now – or my Etsyshop.

About the yarn
The pattern uses Garnstudio’s Alpaca. It is a 100 % alpaca wool yarn and is available in a wide range of colours. Don’t worry if it comes out a bit uneven. It will look better and more even once it is blocked.

Main Yarn: – Garnstudio Drops Alpaca, 1 skein (total: 50 g, ca 180 m)
Needle : – 3 mm/ca US size 2-3 dpns
Tension/Gauge: 23 st = 10 cm

Technique
Difficulty: Intermediate
Stitches used: knit, purl, increasing, decreasing, purled increasing, purled decreasing, cables, mid project cast on, knitting in the round.

Abbreviations
st(s) – stitch(es)
k – knit
p – purl
k2tog – knit 2 together
p2tog – Purl 2 together
skp – slip, knit, pass slipped stitch over – one stitch decreased
sl – slip one stitch

Special abbreviations
r-inc – increase one by k1 into st from previous row beneath just knitted st on right needle
l-inc – increase one by k1 into st from previous row beneath the first st on the left needle
p r-inc – increase one by p1 into st from previous row beneath just knitted st on right needle
p l-inc – increase one by p1 into st from previous row beneath the first st on the left needle
cable 4 left – put 2 st on cable needle in front of work, k2, k2 from cable needle
cable 4 right – put 2 st on cable needle to the back of work, k2, k2 from cable needle
cross 2 left – put 2 st on cable needle in front of work, p2, k2 from cable needle
cross 2 right – put 2 st on cable needle to the back of work, k2, p2 from cable needle

Hand warmers
The hand warmers are knitted in the round with decreases towards the wrist to keep them snug. The increases for the hand is done within the cable pattern on the back of the hand. Increases for the thumb is done in a wedge shape slightly to the front of the hand.

General reminders
Almost all of the even number rounds are knit over knit stitches and purl over purled stitches but be aware that there are exceptions. Read the pattern carefully.
The pattern rows start after 10 cm/4”and are numbered as row 1, etc, from there. Cable pattern stitches are written in italics. Thumb stitches is marked with (thumb).
Row count is marked with = at the end of rows.

Cast on and beginning of left hand
Cast on 48 st with main yarn. Divide between dpns and join to begin working in the round.
Knit 6 rounds of ribbing by k2, p2.
Continue with stocking st (knit all) from the next round.
Decrease 1 st in each side when the work is 2 cm long.
Repeat the decrease 4 times, after every 2 cm (at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 cm), decreasing a total of 10 sts = 38 st
Continue with pattern round 1.

Pattern rounds left hand
Row 1: k26, p6, k6 = 38 st
Row 2: k all knit st from previous row, p all purl st
Row 3: k26, p r-inc, p6, p l-inc, k6 = 40 st
Row 4: k all knit st from previous row, p all purl st
Row 5: k26, p r-inc, p4, r-inc, l-inc, p4, p l-inc, k6 = 44 st
Row 6: – k all knit st from previous row, p all purl st
Row 7: – k26, p r-inc, p5, r-inc, k2, l-inc, p5, p l-inc, k6 = 48 st
Row 8: – k all knit st from previous row, p all purl st
Row 9: – k26, p4, cross 2 right, cross 2 left, p4, k6 = 48 st
Row 10: – k all knit st from previous row, p all purl st
Row 11: – k26 p2, cross 2 right, p2, r-inc, l-inc, p2, cross 2 left, 2 am, k6 = 50 st
Row 12: – k all knit st from previous row, p all purl st
Row 13: – k17, (thumb: l-inc, k2, r-inc), k7, p2, k2, p4, r-inc, k2, l-inc, p4, k2, p2, k6 = 54 st
Row 14: – k all knit st from previous row, p all purl st
Row 15: – k17, (thumb: l-inc, k4, r-inc), k7, p2, cross 2 left, cross 2 right, cross 2 left, cross 2 right, p2, k6 = 56 st
Row 16: – k all knit st from previous row, p all purl st
Row 17: – k17, (thumb: l-inc, k6, r-inc), k7, p4, cable 4 right, p4, cable 4 right, p4, k6 = 58 st
Row 18: – k all knit st from previous row, p all purl st
Row 19: – k17, (thumb: l-inc, k8, r-inc), k7, p2, cross 2 right, cross 2 left, cross 2 right, cross 2 left, p2, k6 = 60 st
Row 20: – k all knit st from previous row, p all purl st
Row 21: – k17, (thumb: l-inc, k10, r-inc), k7, p2, k2, p4, skp, k2tog, p4, k2, p2, k6 = 60 st
Row 22: – k36, p2, k2, p3, p2tog, p2tog, p3, k2, p2, k6 = 58 st
Row 23: – k17, (thumb: l-inc, k12, r-inc), k7, p2, cross 2 left, p4, cross 2 right, p2, k6 = 60 st
Row 24: – k all knit st from previous row, p all purl st
Row 25: – k17, (thumb: l-inc, k14, r-inc), k7, p4, cross 2 left, cross 2 right, p4, k6 = 62 st
Row 26: – k all knit st from previous row, p all purl st
Row 27: – k16, (thumb: p2, [k2, p2] 4 times), k6, p6, cable 4 right, p6, k6 = 62 st
Row 28: – k all knit st from previous row, p all purl st
Row 29: – k16, (thumb: p2, [k2, p2] 4 times), k6, p4, cross 2 right, cross 2 left, p4, k6 = 62 st
Row 30: – k all knit st from previous row, p all purl st
Row 31: – k16, p1, (thumb: cast off 16 st in pattern), p1, k6, p4, k2, p4, k2, p4, k6 = 46 st
Row 32: – k17, cast on 2, k7, p4, k2, p4, k2, p4, k6 = 48 st
Row 33: – k26, p4, cross 2 left, cross 2 right, p4, k6 = 48 st
Row 34: – k17, l-inc, k2, r-inc, k7, p6, k4, p6, k6 = 50 st
Row 35: – k28, p6, skp, k2tog, p6, k6 = 48 st
Row 36: – k all knit st from previous row, p all purl st
Row 37: – [p2, k2] 12 times = 48st
Row 38-40: – k all knit st from previous row, p all purl st = 48 st
Cast off in pattern.

Right hand
Start as for left hand but mirror image the pattern rounds of the left for the right hand.

Making up
Fasten all loose threads. Block both hand warmers and take care so that they are blocked with the same measurements.

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The contents of this pattern and its knitted design are subject to copyright. Even though it’s offered for free please respect the copyright and use this pattern only for your personal non-commercial use. Do not publish it without the designers consent, distribute or sell electronic or paper copies of this pattern, or commercially sell any items produced using the directions in this pattern. © CarolineCreations 2010

The spring is just around the corner and I am knitting cabled accessories that will keep me warm for those last chilly days and nights. With enough wool on my head and hands I know I will be able to take off the winter coat a bit earlier and with spring equinox tomorrow I just can’t wait to shed the outer layers of winter and start with the lighter garments of spring.

With that in mind I have a pattern for a pair of hand warmers that will keep the hands and wrists warm and cosy while keeping the fingers free. The Harper’s Handwarmers was originally designed for winter indoors use but will be very handy now that the winter mittens will have to come off. They are knitted in Garnstudio’s Alpaca, a fine 100 % alpaca yarn, and are thin enough to be used even for chilly summer nights or a little too cold wedding day for a spring bride.

The hand warmers are available for free here on the blog but only in one size and with written instructions only. It should be easy enough to follow but if you want to be on the safe side you can buy a pdf-file for $2 that has a chart as well as full written instructions for both hands in three sizes.

My other pattern for March is a cabled tam that unites my love for cables, hats and knitting patterns with a pagan flare. The Pentagram Tam is a tam with a cabled pentacle on the top since I just couldn’t resist the temptation of transferring the interweaving lines of the pentacle into interweaving cables.  The pattern comes in two versions with either a cabled edge or a vintage style ribbed edge. It is a challenged for the intermediate knitter since there are some complicated angels on the cables but that shouldn’t be to hard for an experienced knitter. It is knitted in Garnstudio’s Alaska, a 100 % worsted wool yarn, that comes in a wide rang of colours and shows off the cables very well.

The Pentagram Tam is available as a pdf-file for $5. It has instructions for both cabled and ribbed edge in three sizes. The pattern has written instructions a well as a chart for the cables.

Merry spring and merry knitting to you all!